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Oct. 22nd, 2017 08:38 am[personal profile] cesy
cesy: "Cesy" - An old-fashioned quill and ink (Default)
Fannish people with money, [community profile] fandomlovespuertorico currently has a lot of bargains and very few bidders.
starwolf_oakley: (Default)
Here's a page from a flashback to when Tony Stark met Mary Jane Watson. I am not quite sure when it takes place, but it happens when Mary Jane was a model and when Tony was hitting the sauce. So it is before IRON MAN #128?

One page )

A Dragon of a Different Color

Oct. 21st, 2017 09:04 pm[personal profile] marycatelli posting in [community profile] books
marycatelli: (Golden Hair)
A Dragon of a Different Color by Rachel Aaron

Book 4, picking up speed so that the volumes are more like divisions in a single story. Serious spoilers ahead.
Read more... )
laughing_tree: (Default)


This isn't Fables. But my bet is it's for the same people who like Fables. -- Bill Willingham

Read more... )

He saw a personal ad asking for him.

Oct. 21st, 2017 12:39 am[personal profile] thanekos posting in [community profile] scans_daily
thanekos: Yoshikage Kira as Kosaku Kawajiri, after the second arrow. (Default)
He felt ill.

He went home.

He felt worse.

He attacked his wife.

He tied her up first. )

Empire #0

Oct. 20th, 2017 11:24 pm[personal profile] history79 posting in [community profile] scans_daily



"I reserve the right to change my mind [laughs], but Barry and I have talked about it many times and one thing we like in the world we’ve built is that there is no Justice League waiting in the wings, no Fantastic Four, no Avengers to set the world right. It is not a story of what happens when the villain wins until the heroes wake up, it’s about there not being any more superheroes."

- Mark Waid


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Batwoman #8

Oct. 20th, 2017 03:43 pm[personal profile] caivu posting in [community profile] scans_daily
starlady: Peggy in her hat with her back turned under the SSR logo (agent carter)
Professor Marston and the Wonder Women (2017), dir. Angela Robinson
I loved this film so much and I'd bet that almost everyone reading this will love it too. Based on the real-life story of the creator of Wonder Woman and his wife and their partner, the movie has been winning deserved praise for its respectful portrayal of a poly love story, as well as its exploration of exploring kink and BDSM in a relationship. The story of Bill Marston, Elizabeth Marston and Olive Byrne is fascinating, and Robinson leaps off the agreed-upon documentary record to make it a full-on romantic trio, with Elizabeth and Olive's sexual relationship being just as important and real as either woman's relationship with Marston. Despite all that, however, the film is mostly inexplicit; Robinson is far more focused on the depiction of relationships through the way people look at each other than through body parts. It is, in other words, extremely female gaze, and very sexy. I would happily have watched another hour of the movie, particularly as the latter half gets into the challenges of queer parenting in a homophobic society in a way I wasn't expecting, but the movie's conventional structure means that there's only so much time. Still, it was wonderful, and all the actors were great. Go see it.

The Princess & the Frog (2009)
Disney's last traditionally animated feature film, its first featuring a black princess, and probably the only Disney princess movie I hadn't seen. I liked the story of Tiana and her feckless prince, and from my admittedly inexpert position it seemed like the non-white characters were largely depicted in a positive manner. The story is sweet, but it owes so much to Shrek, it's kind of painful, and the thing that really struck me is that even as Disney put a lot of effort into moving beyond racist stereotypes in its depiction of the non-white characters, they were unwilling or incapable of to get beyond lazy stereotypes and fatphobic tropes in their depictions of villains and fat people. (I was also interested to see that the dupe villain gets a British accent, since the movie being set in New Orleans means that Disney was unable to rely on its main vocal stereotyping strategy of having the villains speak in Southern accents.) All of which is to say, there's ultimately no comparison between this movie and some of Disney's more recent successes.
alicemacher: Lisa Winklemeyer from the webcomic Penny and Aggie, c2004-2011 G. Lagacé, T Campbell (Default)




A repost of one of my Hallowe'en 2014 selections! H.P. Lovecraft's classic 1924 tale of horrific family secrets gets the Richard Corben (writing as, appropriately, "Gore") treatment in the underground comic Skull #5 (Last Gasp, 1972). NSFW warning for gore.

'Is it Edward Norrys' fat face on that fungus thing?' )

Saga, Chapter Forty-Six

Oct. 21st, 2017 12:03 am[personal profile] laughing_tree posting in [community profile] scans_daily
laughing_tree: (Default)


When Pia Guerra and I started Y: The Last Man that was our impulse: Let’s make a comic book for people who don’t yet know that they love comics. I think for a lot of people it’s kind of an intimidating art form to get into. Even if you’ve been reading comics your whole life, you take it for granted sometimes. It’s hard to just open up this page of panels—you don’t know how to read it. With Y: The Last Man we were like, let’s think about it so that if you’ve only ever read Calvin and Hobbes in your daily paper growing up, you will be able to read this comic. And I think with Saga we tried to hone that even more. -- Brian K. Vaughan

Read more... )
laughing_tree: (Seaworth)


When I was a kid, Superman quite literally saved my life.

I have always been a devotee. Captivated by superhero comics when I was no more than four years old, they became the foundation of my existence. They always buoyed me in times of trouble, but even they couldn't elevate me when I was hitting high school. I was from a broken home, I was incessantly bullied in school, I wasn't handling any of it well, and the darkness of my depression had me -- and I am not exaggerating, forgive me -- suicidally depressed that no one really gave a damn about me and no one ever would.

And in that mood, on a January afternoon in 1979, I went to see Superman: The Movie, and it changed everything. I sat through it twice, full of joy I have rarely experienced since. I knew Superman was a fictional character. I knew Christopher Reeve was an actor. But together, alchemically, magically, they communicated something profound to me: Superman cared. He cared about everyone.

Even me.


-- Mark Waid

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